Early stage IT and Healthcare Investing

Flip Gianos

flipgianos

Managing Director

"I believe starting a new company is like a puzzle; to be successful you need the right pieces and to fit them together properly. I enjoy helping entrepreneurs put the puzzle together."

InterWest Team

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Prior Investments

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Flip has been part of InterWest's IT team since 1982. With a background in engineering, he has invested in multiple areas of information technology, including semiconductors, computing and networking equipment, and infrastructure and applications software. Flip was a board member of Xilinx (XLNX), a publicly-held company, from 1984 to 2016 and chairman from 2009 through 2015.  He is a board member of several privately-held companies, including Microfabrica and Pelican Imaging. Flip also serves on the advisory board of Storm Ventures II and is a past president of the Western Association of Venture Capitalists.

 

From 1973 to 1980, Flip worked in engineering management at IBM, where he managed both chip design and systems integration for several IBM office automation products.

Flip earned his M.B.A. from Harvard University and received his M.S. and B.S. in electrical engineering from Stanford University. He has one international and two U.S. patents.

Prior Investments

 

CIENA (IPO 1997, CIEN), Convey Computer (Acquired by Micron, 2015), Copper Mountain Networks  (IPO 1999, CMTN), Edify (IPO 1996, EDFY), Kalpana (Acquired by Cisco in 1994), Lightera (Acquired by CIENA in 1999), Nanogen (IPO 1998, NGEN), Network Computing Devices (IPO 1992, NCDI), PlaceWare (Acquired by Microsoft in 2003), Power Integrations (IPO 1997, POWI), Ramp Networks (IPO 1999, RAMP), Rendition (Acquired by Micron in 1998), Sitera (Acquired by Vitesse in 2000), SpectraLinear (Acquired by Silicon Labs in 2011), Stratacom (Acquired by Cisco in 1992), Xilinx (IPO 1990, XLNX)

Working with the entrepreneurial CEO is my favorite part of venture capital. A CEO can often feel isolated; I try to be someone who will take the time, listen, exchange ideas, and occasionally coax people through difficult decisions. It is difficult for a board member to contribute at the detailed operational level - management should manage the company. However, over the years, working with many companies, we can make management aware of the patterns they may not see; our experience with similar situations combined with management's experience with the specifics makes for a better decision.

Flip Gianos
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