Testing the Big Bend Theory: And the Winners Are….

Last November, I wrote an article posted in PandoDaily titled, “A VC wants startups to move to Bend, OR so he can incubate them.”

I have been traveling to Bend on summer vacations for many years. It is a fantastic outdoor community located in Central Oregon with around 100,000 people in the town and surrounding area. If you like to hike, bike, camp, fish, raft, ski, or drink incredible microbrew beer, Bend is your kind of place.

Over the past 10 years, however, Bend has been quietly transforming from its sleepy recreational roots into a burgeoning high-tech community with senior executive Silicon Valley transplants, a tech accelerator an annual venture conference, data centers from Facebook and Apple located nearby, and more than 40 software companies in and around town.

Dino Vendetti is a transplanted Silicon Valley VC who now lives in Bend fulltime. He and I were connected through some mutual acquaintances and began to strategize on how we might get even more startups interested in moving to Bend.

Why? Because Dino saw an ecosystem for tech startups starting to form, and he believed that with some help it could flourish, bringing more stable jobs to a community where people value education, family and a healthy lifestyle. Thus began his mission to develop and nurture this ecosystem in Bend, recruiting people like me to a play a part.

So, Dino and I came up with an idea for a contest. We called it “The Big Bend Theory.” Our objective: to introduce and recruit top tech talent into the area.

We opened the contest to anyone with a high-growth startup, or an idea for a startup. We asked entrants to send us their pitches and tell us what they are doing and why Bend is where they should be doing it.

We offered to treat a few entrepreneurs from the winning companies to an all-expense-paid weekend in Bend, giving them the opportunity to experience Bend for themselves and to see if this might be a place to locate their company, employees, and even families.

If they should choose to relocate their businesses to Bend, we offered to provide temporary tech space (at no cost), assistance with getting their team and families settled, and help in their funding efforts.

After reviewing 30 qualified applications from entrepreneurs around the nation, we made some difficult decisions and whittled it down to four winners. Originally we’d planned to select three, but with so many good candidates we couldn’t resist awarding a weekend in Bend to four entrepreneurs we think have the vision to contribute to the community – and a company worth investing in.

Today, I’m pleased to announce our four winners!

Company: TheSphere – www.thesphere.comCEO: Charles Armstrong
What they do: The leading platform for 360º content. Its technology is backed by 20 pending patents and is reaching the market through partnerships with companies like HomeAway, Sony and Samsung.
Why we chose them: “Insanely great” 360º video technology.

Company: AdStage – www.adstage.comCEO: Sahil Jain
What they do: All-in-one advertising platform for Facebook, Google, Bing, and LinkedIn. Why we chose them: Leading edge LinkedIn advertising platform.

Company: Aria Systems – www.ariasystems.comCEO: Tom Dibble
What they do: Help companies around the globe using its cloud-based, enterprise-class platform for subscription and usage-based billing.
Why we chose them: Part of the InterWest portfolio. Interested in moving an entire function inside the company to Bend, reducing ability for others to recruit key talent away from the company.

Company: Stealth
CEO: Eric Bahn
What they do: We can’t tell you but trust us, Eric is a pretty cool guy with some great ideas.
Why we chose them: We could tell you, but then we would have to kill you, which would ruin the whole thing for everyone.

On March 13th these winning entrepreneurs and their significant others will fly up on a direct 50-minute flight from SFO to the Redmond, OR airport that is just a 20-minute drive from downtown Bend.

Everyone will stay at Bend’s suave Oxford Hotel, and we will kick off the excitement with a networking event on Thursday evening at The Loft, a private social club in the heart of Bend.

On Friday, our guests will have the opportunity to meet with some of the talented software entrepreneurs headquartered in Bend along with key business leaders, educational leaders, Silicon Valley transplants, and real estate professionals. This should give everyone a better idea of what Bend has to offer beyond clean air and uncongested roads.

On Saturday, the visiting entrepreneurs and their guests will enjoy some of the fun outdoor activities that have put Bend on the map (and drew me here in the first place), followed by another exclusive networking event that evening.

On Sunday, we will wrap it up, everyone will fly back to SFO, and our hope is that some of these entrepreneurs will be inspired by what they experienced in Bend.

Dino and I are very excited to host this event. We believe we have some great people representing some great companies that would make great new additions to the thriving tech culture that is heating up in Bend.

The Big Bend Theory started as an experiment to see what would happen if you introduced really smart people to a growing tech community. I’ll let you know how our experiment goes after we meet with a few of the companies next month.

 

Siebel v Salesforce — Lessons from the Death of a Tech Goliath

Yesterday, Fortune.com posted an article I had been contemplating writing for several years.

It was a point of view story on the collapse of Siebel Systems and the rise of Salesforce to become the global leader in CRM. Well, at least a large portion of the CRM market.

In case you didn’t see the Fortune article, click here to read it. When you have finished, come back and the following narrative might add some color as they had to edit down the original and it lost a few points I had wanted to make.

The Big “Bend” Theory

BendTech

BendTech

BendTechJPEG My family and I have been traveling to Bend, Oregon many years now for summer vacation.

Typically, we pull our Airstream from the San Francisco Bay Area in a 10 hour drive up I5 through central California, past 14,180 ft Mount Shasta and the town of Weed, onto highway 97 to one of the many beautiful parks that surround the Bend area. We then spend a couple weeks using our campsite as a jump off point for mountain and road biking, fly fishing, and hiking.

While we haven’t yet been there during the winter, Mt. Bachelor is a popular ski destination where locals can leave early from work and be on the slopes in less than an hour. The town of Bend is classified as “high desert” and in the rain shadow of the Cascade range. So, unlike the rest of Oregon, it doesn’t get  much rain — just 11.2 inches — and snowfall averages only 2 feet per year. In fact, they claim 300 days of sunshine each year, as well.

The Power of Consistency

Last week, in preparation for a commercial launch, I asked the CEO of one of my companies the following questions:

  1. Do you and your team feel you know the 3-5 things you do that no other company can do?
  2. Do you feel your customers, prospects and industry analysts understand what these unique capabilities are and value them as “must have”?
  3. Do you believe your Corporate Sales/Investor Presentations, Corporate Demo and Corp Website feature your unique capabilities?
  4. Do you believe each and every person inside your company knows your unique capabilities and value propositions and can recite them verbatim?

These questions sound fairly simplistic but in order to answer affirmatively requires a company to have put in place strong internal communication processes.

 

« Hide It

10 Commandments v 7 Deadly Sins

Just an observation on this “day of rest”.

Do you ever notice that every Sunday, many who follow a religious way of life are reminded of and attempt to live by the 10 Commandments but the other 6 days most seemed compelled to embrace the 7 Deadly Sins?

Speaking of sins, Wrath seems to be a super popular choice – at least on the SF Bay Area freeways.