The Power of Consistency

Last week, in preparation for a commercial launch, I asked the CEO of one of my companies the following questions:

  1. Do you and your team feel you know the 3-5 things you do that no other company can do?
  2. Do you feel your customers, prospects and industry analysts understand what these unique capabilities are and value them as “must have”?
  3. Do you believe your Corporate Sales/Investor Presentations, Corporate Demo and Corp Website feature your unique capabilities?
  4. Do you believe each and every person inside your company knows your unique capabilities and value propositions and can recite them verbatim?

These questions sound fairly simplistic but in order to answer affirmatively requires a company to have put in place strong internal communication processes.

 

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Been a while….

It’s been a while since I made my last post. A number of people have actually noticed and asked, “What’s up?”

In fact my youngest daughter said, “Hey dad, you didn’t make the Forbes’ 10 Best Venture Capital Blogs for Entrepreneurs“. She works for Salesforce in Product Marketing and reads this stuff.

“Yea…thanks for pointing that out,” I said as if I hadn’t already seen the article and been contemplating on how to boost my ratings for next year.

She said, “You need to post regularly if you’re going to win these things, you know.”

I said, “Thanks for the marketing advice.” Having adult children who aren’t afraid to point out your failings can be extremely annoying. I need to remember this the next time I look at revising the Will.

I had thought about making some sort of lame excuse about “being busy” but the truth be told I just haven’t felt compelled to write a new post until now.

How Will Salesforce Adapt to the Next Platform Shift: Mobile Computing?

I posted an article on TechCrunch last Friday. The title of the article was “How Will Salesforce Adapt to the Next Platform Shift: Mobile Computing?”

The purpose of the article was to point out that every decade or so a new computing platform emerges. Market leading incumbents typically have the most to lose when these shifts occur and typically have the most difficult time making the transition due to legacy architectures and revenue streams dependent upon preserving the status quo.

Face(book) It – Your Social Media Strategy isn’t Paying Off

According to eMarketer, last year, U.S. companies spent more than $3 billion on Facebook brand pages and social media advertisements and the return has been universally abysmal. GM went on record in May of this year in the Wall Street Journal saying that FB ads don’t pay off and that GM was ending all investment in FB advertising.

That said, The CMO completed a survey in February 2012 and found “…that marketers continue to increase spend on social media. In the next 5 years, marketers expect to spend 19.5% of their budgets on social media, almost three times more than the current level! Within a year, marketers expect to spend 10.8% of their budgets on social media.”

Unless the results change, however, marketers are going to lose interest in this “shiny new toy” and eventually drop or at least significantly reduce their investments in social media.

That would be a mistake.

The problem doesn’t lie with FB et al per se. The underlying problem, in my opinion, and what has recently been corroborated by research is that your social media strategy needs to include authentic customer engagement and not be viewed and used as yet another one-way digital advertising channel.

To help make this case, one of my portfolio investments, Get Satisfaction!, will hold an event on Thursday, July 26th to unveil recently completed research in this area.

Who Are You Building Your Business Applications For?

I have had the privilege of meeting with many early stage business software CEOs and teams over the past 5 years since moving from an operational role to an investing role.

Each of these teams is passionate about the products they are creating. However, many, in my personal opinion, share something in common that may prevent them from growing their companies as fast as they might otherwise.

Most are so intent on building their products for and then marketing/selling to daily practitioners they forget about creating a version of the product or a set of features in the product for the people who aren’t likely to use the product very often, or at all; the people who must approve the expenditure.