Is Your Business Idea “8 Minute Abs” or “7 Minute Abs”?

For those of you who have seen the movie “There’s Something About Mary”  – the 1998 comedy starring Cameron Diaz, Ben Stiller and many other great actors/comedians - there is a scene where a hitchiker (Harland Williams) is picked up by Ted (Ben Stiller) and the hitchhiker – who the audience knows is a psychotic killer - starts telling Ted about his great new business idea:

Does Amazon’s Woes Put a Cloud Over “Cloud Computing”?

On Saturday, April 22nd, Steve Lohr from the NY Times wrote a column titled, “Amazon’s Trouble Raises Cloud Computing Doubts“. The article asserts that outages with Amazon’s cloud computing services will likely force many companies to rethink their strategy to rely upon outside vendors for their compute and storage services.

The Bubble Machine

If you have at least some sort of marginal interest in what is going on in 2011 with respect to start ups, you can’t help to have read or heard about the new “bubble” controversy.

Valuations and deal sizes for “hot start ups” are reaching lofty heights.

The Value of Growth for SaaS Companies

I received a report from SaaS Capital titled “Leaders and Laggards: SaaS Growth and the Cost of Capital”. The subject of the report is how the public markets value a high growth SaaS company (their definition of high growth is >25% YoY).

The report states, “13 public SaaS companies tracked by Pacific Crest Securities have increased in value 40% since the beginning of 2008. During that same period, the S&P index has yet to return to its pre-recession value.”

Managing Hyper Growth So “The Wheels Don’t Come Off”

I was reading the Wall Street Journal this past Saturday and came across an article on page B3 regarding GroupOn’s revenue growth from 2009 to 2010.   For anyone who has been asleep for the past year, GroupOn is a “daily deals” website offering online discount coupons for primarily local goods/services.

According to the article, from $33M in 2009, GroupOn’s revenue virtually exploded in 2010 to $750M. From an employee base of 120 in 30 cities in 2009, the company now has 4,000 employees across 565 cities. Holy cow!